Make sure that care your elderly relative needs isn't omitted in assisted living or a nursing facility

This is the thirty-fourth in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

The previous article discussed how duplicate prescriptions might arise, overdosing your loved one who lives in assisted living or nursing/skilled nursing. This article discusses the opposite problem: how needed care may be omitted.

Don't just walk away when a relative moves to assisted living

This is the thirty-third in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

Suppose that you have helped an elderly relative move into an assisted living apartment or into a room in a nursing or skilled nursing facility. Now you can breathe a big sigh of relief, knowing that they will be well taken care of, right?

Not so fast.

Declutter your home to safely age in place

This is the thirty-second in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

The previous two weeks’ columns have discussed Senior Move Management, a process that helps people make the transition from a house they may have lived in for many years to a smaller home, typically an apartment in a retirement community.

What if you plan to stay in your home for a while longer, but sort of wish that you were moving, just so that you could start over without the accumulated weight of a lifetime of possessions?

What is involved in senior move management?

This is the thirty-first in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

A quick quiz -- which of these would you prefer to do:
• Listen to fingernails on a chalkboard for hours and hours every day?
• Figure out how to downsize to move from your four-bedroom house to a one-bedroom apartment in a retirement community?

How to deal with decades of accumulated stuff so you can move to a retirement community

This is the thirtieth in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

Perhaps you are considering moving to a retirement community, but when you look at the house you’ve lived in for ten or twenty or forty years, you feel discouraged. You remember how hard it was to organize and pack everything the last time you moved – and that may have been decades ago.

How do agencies that provide in-home non-medical services screen and supervise employees?

This is the twenty-ninth in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

If you want to stay in your home but need help with some of the details – getting ready for the day in the mornings, running errands, and so forth – you may decide to engage an agency that provides in-home non-medical services.

But how do you know that a stranger in your home won’t take advantage of you?

What types of non-medical services can the elderly get at home?

This is the twenty-eighth in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

Suppose that you or elderly relatives find the logistics of daily living to be a bit overwhelming.

How to select an agency to provide medical care in your home

This is the twenty-seventh in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

The previous article described medical services available at home, possibly creating an alternative to living in an assisted living center or skilled nursing facility. But how do you choose an agency that will provide the quality of care you or your relatives need?

Recommendations from doctors, nurses, family and friends are a good place to start.

How do you qualify for Medicare-paid medical services at home?

This is the twenty-sixth in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

If you want to stay in your home but have medical conditions that make caring for yourself tricky, what services can help you?

Available services fall into three major buckets: medical services, para-medical services, and non-medical services. This article focuses on medical services, also known as home health services.

Helping an aging relative to live safely at home

This is the twenty-fifth in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement living options.

Previous articles have discussed housing and care options that involve moving out of the home that you -- or an aging relative -- may have lived in for many years. What if you or they don’t want to move?

If you or an aging relative needs a service, the odds are that other people do, too – and there’s a good chance that someone has set up a business or a non-profit to meet the need.

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