Arizona Pioneers' Home: Accommodations and features

This is the twenty-fourth in a series of articles intended to demystify living in a retirement community.

Like a favorite elderly relative, the Arizona Pioneers’ Home is quirky but engaging. Every comment I’ve heard about the Pioneers’ Home has reflected great respect bordering on reverence.
Home to roughly one hundred Pioneers – elderly long-term residents of Arizona, typically with limited means – and disabled miners, the Arizona Pioneers’ Home has a unique approach to creating a pleasant environment.

Arizona Pioneers' Home: A low-cost option for continuing care

This is the twenty-third in a series of articles intended to demystify living in a retirement community.

A stately brick building overlooking the city of Prescott, AZ from the top of a hill just south of downtown is the Arizona Pioneers’ Home. For long-time Arizona residents in good health but of limited means who are seeking a new place to live, it can provide a satisfying alternative to other options for senior housing and care. It has space for about 155 residents and currently houses 97.

What is HUD subsidized senior housing like?

This is the twenty-second in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement communities.

The previous column discussed costs of HUD-subsidized senior apartments. This article describes features of three in Prescott, AZ: Casa de Pinos (run by Retirement Housing Foundation, affiliated with the United Church of Christ), Village Tower (run by the Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society), and Bradshaw Senior Community.

Subsidized senior housing as an alternative to retirement communities

This is the twenty-first in a series of articles intended to demystify retirement communities.

Readers living on limited incomes may find that retirement communities discussed in previous articles are out of reach.

An alternative is very affordable apartments available to people aged 62+ through programs run by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Residents in HUD-subsidized apartments pay a relatively small portion of the rent that their apartments would command on the open market; the federal government pays the rest.

What about free-standing assisted living and nursing/skilled nursing facilities?

This is the 20th in a series of articles discussing senior living alternatives.

Previous articles profiled retirement communities offering a wide range of options from independent living to assisted living and long-term care.

For people unable to live independently, another choice is a stand-alone facility that offers either assisted living or skilled nursing/nursing care. Costs vary, but appear to fall in a range similar to those of the retirement communities.

Do you have to be wealthy to live in a retirement community?

This is the 19th in a series of articles intended to demystify the experience of living in a retirement community.

Costs to live in the communities studied for this series can range from $22,000/year to well over $100,000/year, depending on the community, the size of the room or apartment, and any medical attention needed.

How can you cover the costs of assisted living or long-term care?

This is the 18th in a series of articles intended to demystify the experience of living in a retirement community.

Costs for basic assisted living for one person at sites studied for this series range from $28,000 to $56,000/year. A second person will add from $6,000 to $16,000/year. Additional services can add $2,000 to $20,000 per person per year. And long-term care and skilled nursing care can cost from $73,000 to well over $100,000 per person per year.

What options are available to cover the costs?

How can you cover the costs of independent living in a retirement community?

This is the 17th in a series of articles intended to demystify the experience of living in a retirement community.

Costs for an independent living apartment and meals for one person in communities researched for this series range from $22,000/year to $62,000/year, depending on the community and apartment size. For two people, the cost is generally increased by roughly the cost of meals for a second person. Occasionally, there is a relatively small additional monthly fee unrelated to meals.

So how can you cover the costs?

What do memory care and other long-term care cost in retirement communities?

This is the sixteenth in a series of articles intended to demystify the experience of living in a retirement community.

This column discusses costs for memory care and other long-term care in settings that are part of local retirement communities run by Good Samaritan, Granite Gate and Las Fuentes.

How much do independent and assisted living cost?

This is the 15th in a series of articles intended to demystify the experience of living in a retirement community.

In other parts of the country, people sometimes have to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to buy into a retirement community. The good news in Prescott is that none of the four retirement communities I looked into requires a big upfront fee. The financial arrangements are simpler - closer to renting an apartment than to buying a house.

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